Maternal Urinary Bisphenol A during Pregnancy and Maternal and Neonatal Thyroid Function in the CHAMACOS Study

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Chevrier J, Gunier RB, Bradman A, Holland NT, Calafat AM, Eskenazi B, Harley KG. Maternal Urinary Bisphenol A during Pregnancy and Maternal and Neonatal Thyroid Function in the CHAMACOS Study. Environ Health Perspect (): .doi:10.1289/ehp.1205092

Abstract

Background: Bisphenol A is widely used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic bottles, food and beverage cans linings, thermal receipts and dental sealants. Animal and human studies suggest that BPA may disrupt thyroid function. Although thyroid hormones play a determinant role in human growth and brain development, no studies have investigated relations between BPA exposure and thyroid function in pregnant women or neonates.

Objective: To evaluate whether exposure to BPA during pregnancy is related to thyroid hormone levels in pregnant women and neonates.

Methods: We measured BPA concentration in urine samples collected during the first and second half of pregnancy in 476 women participating in the CHAMACOS study. We also measured free thyroxine (T4), total T4 and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) during pregnancy, and TSH in neonates.

Results: The association between the average of the two BPA measurements and maternal thyroid hormone levels was not statistically significant. Of the two BPA measurements, only the measurement taken closest in time to the TH measurement was significantly associated with a reduction in total T4 (β=-0.13 Hg/dL per log2 unit; 95%CI=-0.25, 0.00). The average of the maternal BPA concentrations was associated with reduced TSH in boys (-9.9% per log2 unit; 95%CI=-15.9%, -3.5%) but not in girls. Among boys, the relation was stronger when BPA was measured in the third trimester of pregnancy and decreased with time between BPA and TH measurements.

Conclusion: Results suggest that exposure to BPA during pregnancy is related to reduced total T4 in pregnant women and decreased TSH in male neonates. Findings may have implications for fetal and neonatal development.

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