The 5 Worst Disasters

The Worst Manmade Disasters in Human History include the following tragedies:

1) Bhopal Gas Tragedy (India)

2) Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Gulf of Mexico

3) Chernobyl Meltdown, Ukraine:

4) Fukushima Meltdown, Japan:

5) Global Warming

Five Most Man-Made Tragic Events in History

1) Bhopal Gas Tragedy (India)

Imagine you wake up in pain in the middle of the night, your eyes burning and your lungs burning. It is hard to believe you are going to make this. Many don’t. It was the same experience many Bhopal residents had when Union Carbide India Limited’s pesticide plant burst into a gas leak on December 2, 1984. Over 500,000 people were subject to methylisocyanine gas, and other chemicals. Many people died in the first hour of the leak. But, there were estimates that the leak led to a total of 5,000-16,000 deaths. These numbers don’t take into account other injuries that survivors may have suffered, such as blindness or organ failure. Bhopal is undoubtedly one of the most devastating industrial disasters.

2) Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Gulf of Mexico

It’s difficult to forget the worst and biggest oil spillage in human history. It happened three years ago. It began on April 20, 2010 with an explosion on BP’s Deepwater Horizon oilrig, which killed 11 workers and injures 17 others. The well was then left gushing oil. BP originally claimed that the leak was 1,000 barrels per hour, but this was not true. The well was leaking anywhere between 40,000 and 162,000 barrels a daily. It took 47.829 people 89 day to cap the well. The clean-up is still far from complete. It’s still too early to assess the extent of the environmental effects from the spillage. The Gulf fishing industry is not yet recovering. However, oil continues to wash ashore along the coast. Coral and wetlands around the area are also in danger. As a result of their exposure to the 1.8million gallons toxic oil dispersant, 3,500 workers and volunteers working at the site cleanup are experiencing liver and kidney damage.

3) Chernobyl Meltdown, Ukraine:

Reactor No. 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded. Radiation from the explosions was greater than both Hiroshima- and Nagasaki atom bombs. Over 350,000 people were evacuated to be resettled in Ukraine and Russia. It took over 500,000 workers, of which 31 died, to end the crisis. These figures don’t take into account the long-term side effects that radiation exposure can have on people’s health. Nearly 4,000 deaths have been attributed to radiation poisoning that people who lived near Chernobyl suffered. While no one knows what the final death toll will be from the meltdown, Chernobyl is the poster child for the dangers associated with nuclear power.

4) Fukushima Meltdown, Japan:

The tsunami caused by the March 11th 9.0 earthquake resulted in three nuclear reactors being damaged at Fukushima daiichi’s nuclear power station. This resulted in the other Level 7 nuclear meltdown than Chernobyl. 600 people died in the evacuation of more than 100,000 people who were evacuated. This only added to the disaster caused by the earthquakes and tsunami. Three hundred cleanup workers were subject to high levels of radioactive waste. Six workers exceeded the limit for lifetime radiation doses within the first few weeks after cleanup began. While it’s too soon to know the long-term health consequences of the disaster, there could be more than 1,300 people affected by the event. This includes those who live far from the melting point. We know it will take at least decades to understand all the complications that result from the meltdown. Many are already arguing this was worse than Chernobyl.

5) Global Warming

Global warming is one the most important and ongoing man-made disasters. It will have the longest-lasting impact on humanity. Global warming is a result of excessive greenhouse gases, especially CO2, being introduced to the atmosphere. It has led to an increase in average global temperatures and could have dire consequences. Already, climate-change refugees have been created by rising sea levels, desertification, storm damage like Hurricane Katrina. Some estimate that the number will reach 150 million in 2050. Even if the science isn’t convincing, ocean acidification has begun. As oceans absorb more carbon it turns into carbonic acids and decreases dissolved oxygen concentration, making some oceanic environments non-habitable. Our dependence on seafood has made it increasingly difficult for humanity to eat. Global warming and ocean acidification together are the greatest challenges mankind has faced.

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